Coda 2018 Cywain Gobaith

At Coda 2018 in Llanidloes 27th – 29th July:

We are gathering hope. If only the gleanings are
brought together as a basket of bread not left to go
stale but shared out enough to feed the inspired
small things that we do together. If only the gleanings;
gatherings of potential, a momentum of hope to change
grow and create new voices raised, stirred, moved.
A gently kindled fire. If only, what is reaped may
be sown and what is scattered may be gathered in again
then together – we may gather hope anew.

Gathering Hope is not a gathering of hope, a hopeful gathering or even gathering in Hope! (as they say in North East Wales Live in Hope, die in Caergwrle.) No, this is none of the the above. It does mean coming together with our dreams and visions for a together world, one seated at the same table, neither host nor guest. With a welcome of equity that those who are in need would be fed from the storehouses and those who can give would be serving the feast. This is Gathering Hope. A place to be sent out from with renewed energy to begin to understand, and then engage with the issues of our own communities and the issues around us in this world. If we can be sat at the same table, be in conversation and begin to make friends with those with whom we might profoundly disagree, we might just then be ready to walk with them and eager to love them. (Richard Rohr: Eager to Love) In order to do this we are Gathering Hope not to hold on to it, but to let it go, to enable new visions which transcend boundaries, cross thresholds, join hearts, and recognise lives connected at the deep down
So, bring your hopes, dreams, visions and join us Gathering Hope.

Tickets available 1st November

@gwylcoda     www.coda.cymru     facebook.com/gwylcoda

Coda

Coda
The gentle imperative that begins
deep in your heart.  It is the whisper
that will not let go no matter how hard
you try to ignore it.  As the beating
drum of the world goes on insisting
the path we tread.  Turn aside, see
before us the waters are stirred up
there is an agitation that will not give
in until we rise in answer to their cry
to catch the moment that brings to
birth a new beginning.

 

Written for Gŵyl Coda ym Metws-y-Coed. 

Coda is a welsh word meaning ‘rise up’.  It also is a term in music for the part which stands at the end and reflects on the whole piece.

@GwylCoda  facebook.com/gwylcoda

 

Sabbath Rest? Coda!

They say God left the best till last. I’m not talking about the humans, created as our genesis narrative would have us think on the sixth day, at the 11th hour.  Better throw something into the mix to stir it up a bit.  It’s all a bit too perfect.  Closing time never offers the finest work, a last thought after a busy week, oh yes the humans.  I know it’s a caricature, and it is all a bit Eddie Izzard.  If we look at the genesis material, there is nothing to say that what came last is best or better than the rest.  That’s just our understanding of it because, strangely enough it was written down by us, or at least our early relations perhaps in Iraq somewhere between the Tigris and the Euphrates – trying to make sense of the world they saw around them. On most calendars Sunday is the first day of the week.  Or is Sunday the last day of the week on yours?  Is Sunday what you build up to, or work from.  The Jewish Sabbath was the last day of the week.  The Jewish celebrations for Sabbath centre on the Genesis narrative of creation building up to the seventh day.  As God rested from all his work, so Jewish communities  honour it.  It is a chicken and egg question.  Which came first?  Creation narrative or Sabbath rest. I’d go with sabbath rest.  Why?  Because the early tribes who followed this particular way of life were nomadic and were closely attached to the land.  They understood the natural seasons far better than we do.  Look at the jubilee regulations.  Every seventh year there should be a sabbath for the land.  This wasn’t just thought up, this was good land husbandry.  There was also an economic jubilee.  So however it came about, the Jewish tribes followed a Sabbath at the end of the week and at the seventh year and the 70th year.  In Christianity, the first Easter was the first day of the week, the day after the Sabbath.  In effect we moved sabbath to Sunday, we’ve just added the Easter celebrations to the Jewish festival, and transferred that on top of Sunday.  However, I wonder if it is possible to recapture the essence of sabbath.  Not viewed in a strictly linear way as the genesis narrative would have us think.  But what is intended by a day of rest.  Sabbath, for me, should stand outside of time.  It is not a day but a state of mind.  Do we allow ourselves to think in terms of true sabbath at all?  Sunday can become so holy and precious that we are not able to rest for all the business of services and worship preparation, planning and looking to the future.  I want to distinguish between Sabbath and The Sabbath.  What then has The Sabbath become?  A day (for some) to twiddle thumbs waiting for the shops to open once again?  Those days are long past.  The Sabbath in that sense has been forgotten save for a few faithful travellers.  A return to those days is a wistful dream.  But what is the essence of that?  Though Sunday closing for shops, business and pubs will not return, there is something to be honoured in that desire for stillness, to see seventh day restfulness for ourselves for the land and for the economic.  I’d like to suggest that sunday ought to be the ‘day of preparation.’  In the Jewish tradition this was the sixth day of the week.  All the preparations for the sabbath were done on this day.  The meal, the house everything was prepared to observe the Sabbath.  I always wonder, as indeed did Jesus, what happened to all the farmers on the sabbath, surely they could not prepare everything for the animals in advance.  Jesus asks, who would not untie his donkey on the sabbath to allow him a drink of water.  It is not about doing nothing, but about having the right state of mind.  In order that we can carry that state of mind of sabbath with us throughout the week, in order that we can have sabbath moments in all our work and in all we do, perhaps Sunday should become for us the day of preparation.  A day not necessarily to prepare food for the week, or though for some that is what it has already become – by that I mean the shopping day!  I don’t think we ought to beat ourselves up about this.  I think we can give a new significance to Sunday without diminishing the aspect of Sabbath which is most important and without making us feel guilty for doing something on one particular day of the week when days are so full for the rest of it.  Sunday is a Coda day.  A day to reflect, but also to rise up and be engaged.  A day to take notice of all that is around us and to care about it.  A day to help us prepare to take sabbath into the rest of the week where we can we be co re-creators with the divine re-imagining, regenerating the lost beauty, faith, justice and art of creation.